Monday, 26 August 2013

Making the switch-Animal testing + vegan/cruelty free cosmetics

Hello! How are you? Good, I hope!
 Today I'd like to talk a little about something that has been on my mind lately-animal testing in beauty product manufacturing and why I'm deciding to make the switch to buying products free from animal testing. + some affordable animal testing free/vegan friendly brands that you can try! Grab yourself a cup of tea...or a pot, this will be a long one!

 * It has been illegal to test finished cosmetics on animals in the UK since 1998, and animal testing of ingredients that may be used in cosmetics has been illegal across Europe since 2009. From March 2013 it has been illegal to import and sell cosmetics that have been tested on animals outside the EU.*

 Great news for European countries right? However, it is somewhat misleading. Around 80% of the world are still using animals in testing.Which in other words means that even if you are in the EU, you could still be supporting animal testing indirectly by buying from brands that sell in countries such as China where animal testing is mandatory. Which is why, I'm 'making the switch' to buy from brands that I know do not test on animals worldwide as I'd rather pay postage or do a little further research to know that I'm buying from brands that are truly cruelty free, not just in their European products. 

*So, why am I deciding to go cruelty free?*
It's easy really; because I've now done my research. Simply after uncovering what animal testing is-it is easy to see, that especially in the cosmetic industry, it is unnecessary, cruel and misleading and I really don't feel comfortable anymore buying from brands that are involved in animal testing.

*What exactly is animal testing then?* 
-Reader discretion advised,some content in this section readers may find shocking-
info/facts taken from PETA.org and other relevant websites
 Animal testing; also known as animal experimentation, is the term used for experimentation on animals. These animals can include mice, rats, rabbits, primates, cats and dogs who spend their lives in barred up cages across the globe where they experience pain, isolation and segregation from the outside world, perhaps never to see a speck of green.
   An animal dies every second and over 100 million die every year in the US. In China-it's actually mandatory to test all cosmetics on animals! These deaths can be from experiments themselves or from ‘disposal’ after an animal is considered ‘finished with’. These deaths come after a short lived ‘life’ cowering in distress, waiting in paranoia, scared for the next terrifying and often excruciatingly painful procedure to be performed on them. The stress, boredom and side effects from these countless on-going procedures can result in many animals developing nervous traits including spinning in circles, pulling out fur, biting skin and even rocking back and forth continually, not to mention crouching away in fear at the sight of a human; even through the bars of their cages.
  I can’t even give you precise animal testing statistics because they aren't available. Mice, rats, birds and cold blooded animals go unaccounted for despite making up 95% of animals used in experiments, as if they are non-existent.The testing of cosmetics,especially, on these animals cause hundreds of thousands of them to be poisoned, blinded and killed.
  Animals suffer and die every year from experimentation for not just cosmetic but chemical, drug and other consumer products. Even in biology lessons and during medical training and experiments at universities, animals are being tested on and many people from countries around the globe are being taught that it is necessary to do so. Is it necessary for rats and mice to be forced to inhale toxic fumes? For dogs to be force-fed pesticides, and primarily beagles, to be taken advantage of because they are trusting in nature? For rabbits to have chemicals rubbed into their eyes with the argument that they have no tear ducts supposedly justifying it?  How can it be necessary to do any of this, how can it be considered at all humane when many of these tests are not even required by law and when tested on animals often produce misleading results? Humans and other animals reactions to products differ. A product that can produce devastating results on an animal can still be sold to the high street shopper. Worldwide, money is wasted on cruel and misleading animal experiments instead of spending the money on promising new technologies that are actually relevant to humans. This would mean no unnecessary pain for other species and a great step forward for us in producing safer cosmetics as well as medicines and other consumer products.

*What can I do?*
Every single one of us can help save animals across the planet from suffering and death due to experimentation by both demanding for changes to stop animal experimentation and by buying cruelty free products. Plus by demanding the use of alternatives to animal testing-which DO exist! There are alternatives to animal testing, and guess what, they can be better and safer;not just for other species, but for us as well! These alternatives or 'replacement methods' include corrositex tests,in vitro and epidemiological studies,computer testing and clinical studies. Even while some replacement methods are still in the process of being worked on (medicine/drugs related) cosmetics is the number 1 animal tested consumer buy that does not require animal testing.
  While the EU have made amazing changes to their animal testing laws, if companies are still testing their products on animals in this cruel way in other countries, you could be indirectly supporting and buying into a company that supports animal testing. 

*Where can I buy from?* 
Despite the fact I live in the UK, my vanity case does hold a few products from brands that test on animals outside the EU. This means I've been unknowingly (until recently) been supporting companies that while not testing the products in my case, do test the same products in other countries. The products from those brands, I will use up and then not buy from again until the day that animal testing is banned worldwide or until their policies change. I am now only buying from 100% cruelty free brands that do not sell in countries where animal testing is mandatory. For all those worried about not having enough makeup choice, here's a rather extensive PETA approved list to keep you from your worries! http://www.peta.org/living/beauty-and-personal-care/companies/default.aspx


I love makeup but I want to enjoy it with a clear conscience that I'm not supporting something I don't believe in. So, I'm ditching revlon,maybelline & rimmel for MUA, collection, Barry M, Bourjois & more!  Here are some of my favourite new purchases...

MUA liquid liner shade 5- Jet black colour, easy to use for beginners,precision line, perfect cat eye, average staying power, can flake after a few hours wear 
Laval liquid foundation-Porcelain-a light coverage foundation, BB cream consistency with a great scent, perfect for not too shabby skin days, set with loose powder for a more matte finish. 'No makeup' look. Porcelain colour is great for very pale skin.
MUA concealer light-creamy consistency for a stick concealer, glides on, can accentuate any very dry patches but great for any smaller spots and can be applied to dark circles with a damp sponge for a 'awakened look'



So that's all for today, what's your favourite vegan brands? For me, Barry M for sure but I love MUA and will definitely be purchasing more of their very affordable cosmetics-including their eye shadow pallets which I hear nothing but praise about for their 'amazing pigmentation'. More on that later though ;)

Room decor DIYs & more up this week!

Please excuse picture quality-will have my camera sorted asap.
Stay tuned
Love
<3




3 comments:

  1. Lovely post!! Id like to nominate you for a Liebster Award! details on my blog!
    Love Emily x
    Handfulofemily.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thank you so much, sounds exciting! <3

      Delete
  2. Bourgeois DO test on animals in other countries

    ReplyDelete

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